The Lighthouse

Lighthouse

Time for another update, sadly I don’t often get round to writing any more articles for this blog, and when I do I dislike what I’ve previously done and start again without finishing, and so a vicious cycle emerges!

As for the photographic side of things, I have been taking pictures which are leaning to more of the documentary side than the aesthetic side, they are on good old-fashioned film and I haven’t had the roll developed yet! Luckily I had this edit which I had completely forgotten about, and thought it was pretty enough to share with everyone.

I’m really going to miss the city in which this shot was taken: Plymouth. I have spent the past 4 years of my life living and studying there and am saddened, perhaps even regretful, that I have to leave. Although the city is hardly what one would describe as exceptional or pleasant, I have developed both a fondness and familiarity for the area which can only be obtained through a prolonged stay. I found myself considering the ugly, grey towers of the 1960s that scar the landscape to be charming and characteristic of the area, reflections of the city’s history. The same can be said for the toothless, unwashed dwellers of the city centre, who at the time were petulant and abrasive, and are now considered to be aligned with the good memories I have of the place.

These things are but trivialities compared to the friends I made, the romances I had, and the stories I have to tell, some as strange and ridiculous as you have ever heard. I mean to chronicle the best of them at some point in the future before they are buried beneath new memories. And so it was with a heavy heart that I gazed out of my father’s car at the blurred and distorted streets which had been the stage and set of this act of my life’s play.

Nonetheless I am excited about the future, and there are only good things to come now, though I still find it important to reflect.

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Plymouth, UK

Plymouth, UK

It’s rare for those who live in Plymouth, a city with notoriously wet and cold weather, to enjoy a day at the end of February which could forgivably be mistaken for mid-summer.

We decided to embrace the sun’s fleeting rays and made for the coast.

Clambering over the rocks I turned to look back at the city and thought it demanded a photograph.

I’m annoyed I didn’t have an instrument more photographically capable than my phone, but it will have to do.

Robby Cowell 2012